Open access peer-reviewed chapter

Electromechanical Co-Simulation for Ball Screw Feed Drive System

By Liang Luo and Weimin Zhang

Submitted: March 12th 2018Reviewed: August 5th 2018Published: November 5th 2018

DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.80716

Downloaded: 235

Abstract

Ball screw feed drive system is the most widely used linear drive system in the field of industrial automation. The continuous search for efficiency puts forward higher requests to the machine tool for high speed and high acceleration, which makes the feed drive system of lightweight-designed and large-size machine tools more likely to produce vibration during high-speed and high-acceleration feed operation. Electromechanical co-simulation for ball screw feed drive dynamics is an important technique for solving vibration problems occurring in the feed motion. This chapter elaborates on this technology from three aspects: modeling and simulation of dynamic characteristics of ball screw feed drive, modeling and simulation of servo control system, and the electromechanical co-simulation of ball screw feed drive system. In this chapter, the basic theoretical models, the establishment of simulation models and the comparison between simulation and experiment results of ball screw feed drive system are comprehensively introduced to provide technical references for readers.

Keywords

  • ball screw feed drive system
  • dynamic characteristics
  • electromechanical co-simulation
  • vibration
  • lumped mass model

1. Introduction

Ball screw feed system is the most widely used linear drive system in the field of industrial automation [1]. In order to enhance the speed and accuracy of present systems further, current research focuses on the vibration reduction and avoidance of the feed drive. Additional damping modules or structures are integrated in the feed drive system to achieve this goal, such as semi-active damping system, set point filtering, etc. Active damping system only reacts once a vibration is present, and set point filtering can lead to path deformation [2, 3, 4]. Another way to solve this problem is to generate a smoother trajectory. For this purpose, numbers of trajectory algorithms are found out, and the frequency contents of the trajectory orders are discussed and compared [5, 6]. The vibration caused by the trajectory is difficult to analyze on hardware because of the coupling factor of variety excitation sources. All these researches need a simulation method to help the researchers or engineers study or optimize the design and parameter setting of the feed drive system [10].

Finite element model of ball screw feed drive system can predict the accurate dynamic characteristics. However, it is difficult to integrate with the simulation model of servo control system. Lumped parameter model of ball screw feed drive system can simplify the simulation model by reducing the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) of the whole system. More importantly, it can easily integrate with the simulation model of the servo control system. A reasonable simplification of the lumped parameter model is the key to accurately predict the vibration of feed drive system [7, 8, 9].

In this chapter an electromechanical co-simulation method for ball screw feed drive system was established, which can be used to study the dynamic characteristics and vibration behavior of the feed drive system. An optimized dynamic modeling and simulation method of a ball screw feed drive based on the lumped mass model was firstly presented, and the optimized calculation method of the equivalent parameters was given. Then, a model of servo control system was built up, and based on it, the electromechanical co-simulation of ball screw feed drive system was established. Finally, a simulative and experimental test is conducted based on a ball screw feed drive system test bench. The result shows that electromechanical co-simulation of ball screw feed drive system could achieve a very good predictability.

2. Dynamic characteristic modeling and simulation of ball screw feed system

2.1. Lumped mass model of ball screw feed system

A typical ball screw feed system consists of a servomotor, coupling, ball screw, work table, and base (Figure 1). The ball screw is supported by two sets of bearing, which are fixed to the base. The servomotor torque is transmitted through a coupling onto the ball screw shaft to drive the work table. The linear guideway constrains the movement of the work table in an axial direction. The base is fixed on the machine bed or placed on the ground. The transformation from the rotational movement of the screw shaft into the linear motion of the work table is realized by the ball screw system with its transmission ratio i, which is defined as the distance of travel hduring one revolution of the shaft as the following:

i=h2πE1

Figure 1.

Typical structure of ball screw drive system. 1. Servomotor; 2. Coupling; 3. Fixed bearing; 4. Screw shaft; 5. Ball screw nut; 6. Work table; 7. Support bearing; 8. Machine bed; 9. Base.

Low-order modes are the main factors affecting the dynamic characteristics of the ball screw feed drive system of machine tools. Typically, the first axial and rotational modes of the ball screw show a dominant influence on the overall dynamics, while the relevance of higher-order modes for most technical applications is rather small [8].

The lumped mass model can reasonably reduce the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) of the simulation model while preserving the low-order modes of the system to simplify calculations. Figure 2 shows the lumped mass model of a ball screw feed drive system. The influence of the shaft on the rotational mode and axial mode of the drive system is explicitly included into the lumped mass model here. Therefore, the shaft is separated into two different branches, an axial branch and a rotational branch, while the coupling once more is realized using constrained equations. Since all components are expressed by discrete springs and dampers, the rigidity values of shaft, coupling, and bearing are combined to an overall axial Kaxand rotational value Krot.

Figure 2.

Lumped mass model of ball screw feed system.

In this model the inertial component parameters are defined as the following: rotary inertia of servomotor JM, screw shaft side equivalent rotary inertia JS, mass of base MB, screw shaft side equivalent mass MS, and mass of the work table MT.

The equivalent rigidity parameters in the model are defined as the following: equivalent torsional rigidity Krot, equivalent axial rigidity Kax, rigidity of ball screw nut Kn, and axial rigidity of the base KB.

The equivalent damping parameters are defined as the following: servomotor torsional damping CM, equivalent torsional damping Crot, screw shaft side damping CS, ball screw nut damping Cn, equivalent axial damping Cax, axial damping of the base CB, and axial damping of the guide Cg.

The DOF parameters of the lumped mass model are defined as the following: angular rotation of the servomotor θM, screw shaft angular rotation at the table position θS, axial displacement of the base XB, screw shaft axial displacement at the table position XS, and work table position XT. Therefore, the deformation of the equivalent springs is described as follows: equivalent torsional spring deformation θMθS, equivalent axial spring deformation XSXB, axial spring deformation of the base XB, and screw nut contact deformation XTXSiθS.

The speed parameters of equivalent damping are defined as the following: servomotor equivalent damping speed θ̇M, equivalent torsional vibration damping speed θ̇Mθ̇S, equivalent damping speed of the screw θ̇S, equivalent damping speed of the base ẊB, equivalent axial damping speed of screw ẊSẊB, equivalent damping speed of screw nut ẊTẊSiθ̇S, and speed of the work table ẊT.

According to the Lagrange’s equations of the second kind, the dynamic model of the ball screw feed drive system is built up. The total kinetic energy T, the potential energy U, and the dissipation function of the system can be expressed using equations (2) through (4):

T=12JMθ̇M2+12JSθ̇S2+12MBẊB2+12MSẊS2+12MTẊT2E2
U=12krotθMθS2+12kBXB2+12kaxXSXB2+12knutXTXSiθS2E3
D=12CMθ̇M2+12Crotθ̇Mθ̇S2+12CSθ̇S2+12CBẊB2+12CaxẊSẊB2+12CnẊTẊSiθ̇S2+12CTẊT2E4

According to the definition of the system lumped mass, we have the independent coordinates system qas the following:

q=θMθSXBXSXTTE5

The force inputs of the ball screw feed system are the servomotor torque TMand cutting force FC, and then the generalized forces Qof the system can be expressed as the following:

Q=TM000FCTE6

With L=TU, the Lagrangian function of the system about the generalized coordinate qand the generalized force Qcan be calculated according to Eq. (7). Then, the matrix form of the lumped mass model of the ball screw feed system can be established as in Eq. (8):

ddtLq̇Lq∂Dq̇=QE7
mq¨+cq̇+kq=QE8

where,

m=JM00000JS00000MB00000MS00000MTk=krotkrot000krotkroti2kn0iknikn00kax+kBkax00iknkaxkax+knkn0ikn0knkn
c=cM+crotcrot000crotcrotcSi2cn0icnicn00cax+cBcax00icncaxcax+cncn0icn0cncn+cg

The dynamic model of the ball screw feed system shown in Eq. (8) was decomposed into three subsystems: screw shaft torsional vibration system, screw shaft axial vibration system, and the table vibration system. The simulation model of the ball screw feed system can be established as Figure 3. The input of the simulation model is the motor torque TMand the cutting force FC, and the outputs are the table acceleration aTand displacement XT.

Figure 3.

Simulation model of a ball screw feed drive.

2.2. Equivalent parameter calculation method of ball screw feed system lumped mass model

Accurate ball screw feed system dynamic model requires a reasonable equivalent parameter calculation method of the lumped mass model. As mentioned the shaft has influence on the rotational mode and the axial mode of the drive system; the shaft is separated into two different branches, an axial branch and a rotational branch, while the coupling is realized using constrained equations. The dynamic characteristics of the feed system should be analyzed to select the appropriate equivalent parameter calculation method. The inertia of the axial system and the inertia of rotational system are not only the mass or inertia of the component itself but also the mass or inertia converted to the independent coordinate system component of the dynamic system.

The equivalent rotary inertia of the screw JSis composed of the rotary inertia of the screw Jsc, the rotary inertia of the coupling Jc, and the mass of the table MTconverted to the rotary inertia of the screw:

JS=Jsc+Jc+MTi2E9

With the material density ρ, namely, equivalent diameter dsand length lsof the screw shaft, the rotary inertia of the screw Jsccan be approximated using the following equation:

Jsc=ρπ32ds4lsE10

The screw equivalent mass MSis composed of screw mass Msc, servomotor rotor mass Mm, and coupling mass Mc; with the material density ρ, namely, equivalent diameter dsand length lsof the screw shaft, the rotary inertia of the screw values Jsccan be approximated using the following equations:

MS=Msc+Mm+McE11
Msc=ρπ4ds2lsE12

The axial rigidity of the ball screw feed system is related to the installation method of the screw. Here is an example of the screw-fixed-support method used on most machine tools (Figure 4). Servomotor side of the screw shaft uses fixed support to provide screw axial support, and the end of the shaft is free support. Therefore, the axial rigidity kaxof the ball screw feed system consists of screw bearing rigidity kb, and the axial rigidity of the screw shaft ksaxis as follows:

kax=1kb+1ksax1E13

Figure 4.

Screw fixation-support installation diagram.

With the material elastic modulus E, screw cross-sectional area A, and ball screw length at table position ln, the axial rigidity of the screw according to the position of the table ksaxcan be established as shown in Eq. (14):

ksax=EAln=πds2E4lnE14

The torsional rigidity of the ball screw feed system krotconsists of the torsional rigidity of the screw ksrotand the torsional rigidity of the coupling kc. According to the position of the table, the torsional rigidity of the screw ksrotcan be approximated with the shear modulus Gand polar rotary inertia of the screw section IPas shown in Eq. (16):

krot=1kc+1ksrot1E15
ksrot=TΔθ=GIPln=Gπds432lnE16

With the nut reference rigidity K, nut axial load Fa, and basic dynamic load Ca, the contact rigidity of the screw nut kncan be expressed as follows:

kn=0.8KFa0.1Ca13E17

3. Servo control system modeling and simulation

3.1. Modeling of permanent magnet synchronous motor

Permanent magnet synchronous motors can be divided into two types according to the rotor type, salient pole rotor and non-salient pole rotor. The structure is shown in Figure 5; in the surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous motor (Figure 5(a)), the magnetic circuit of the rotor is symmetrical, and the magnetic permeability and air gap permeability of the permanent magnet material are approximately the same. In the rotor two-phase coordinate system, the direct-axis inductance and the quadrature-axis inductance are equal, that is Ld=Lq. It is named non-salient pole rotor permanent magnet synchronous motor.

Figure 5.

PMSM motor rotor structure. (a) Surface-mounted; (b) Plug-in; and (c) Interior-mounted.

The rotor magnetic paths of plug-in-type (Figure 5(b)) and built-in-type (Figure 5(c)) permanent magnet synchronous motors are asymmetrical, and the quadrature-axis inductance is greater than the direct-axis inductance, that is Lq>Ld. The rotor shows salient pole effect, which is called salient pole-type permanent magnet synchronous motor.

Taking non-salient pole rotor permanent magnet synchronous motor as an example, we simplify the motor model with the following conditions: neglecting the saturation of the motor core; no eddy current and hysteresis loss; permanent magnet material has zero conductivity; three-phase windings are symmetrical; and induced potential in the winding is sinusoidal. Then, a schematic diagram of the physical model of the motor shown in Figure 6 can be obtained.

Figure 6.

PMSM physical model.

The axis of the sinusoidal magnetomotive wave generated by a flowing forward current through the phase winding is defined as the axis of the phase winding. Take axis A as the spatial reference coordinate of the ABC coordinate system. It is assumed that the positive direction of the induced electromotive force is opposite to the positive direction of the current (motor principle); take the counterclockwise direction as the positive direction of the speed and electromagnetic torque, and the positive direction of the load torque is the opposite. The physical model equation of permanent magnet synchronous motor is as follows:

US=Ris+dΨsdtΨs=Lis+Ψfcosθ+ωtcosθ+ωt+2π/3cosθ+ωt2π/3E18
uAuBuC=R000R000R.iAiBiC+dφAθidtdφAθidtdφAθidtE19

In Formula (18), Rand Lare matrices and their expressions are shown in Formula (20):

Us=UAUBUCTis=iAiBiCTR=RS000RS000RSL=LAMABMACMBALBMBCMCAMCBLCE20

UA, UB, and UCare phase voltages of PMSM stator three-phase windings. IA, IB, and ICare the phase currents of stator three-phase windings. RSis the stator winding value. LA, LB, and LCare stator winding self-inductances. MAB=MBA, MAC=MCA, and MBC=MCBare the stator winding mutual inductances.

3.2. Coordinate transformation

From the above physical model, we can see that in the ABC coordinate system, the PMSM rotor is asymmetric in the magnetic and electrical structures. The motor equation is a set of nonlinear time-varying equations related to the instantaneous position of the rotor, which makes the analysis of the dynamic characteristics of the PMSM very difficult. It is usually necessary to convert the motor equations by coordinate transformation to facilitate analysis and calculation. The coordinate system used in the vector control of the permanent magnet synchronous motor and their relationship is shown in Figure 7. In the figure, the αβcoordinate system is a two-phase stationary coordinate system, and the dqcoordinate system is a two-phase rotating coordinate system that is fixed to the rotor.

Figure 7.

The coordinate system used in the vector control and their relationship.

3.2.1. Clarke transformation

Clarke transformation simplifies the voltage loop equations on the original three-phase windings into the voltage loop equations on the two-phase windings, from the three-phase stator ABC coordinate system to the two-phase stator αβcoordinate system, as shown in Eq. (21); its inverse transform is shown in Eq. (22). However, after the Clarke transformation, the torque still depends on the rotor flux. In order to facilitate control and calculation, Park transformation is also required:

iαiβ=23101/23/21/23/2iAiBiCE21
iAiBiC=32101/21/23/23/2iαiβE22

3.2.2. Park transformation

In the physical sense, the Park transformation is equivalent to projecting the currents ia,ib,iconto the dqaxis. The transformed coordinate system rotates at the same speed as the rotor, and the d-axis and the rotor flux have the same position. The Park transformation is shown in Eq. (23), and the inverse transformation is shown in Eq. (24). This transformation also holds for the three-phase voltage and flux linkage:

idiq=cosθsinθsinθcosθiαiβE23
iαiβ=cosθsinθsinθcosθidiqE24

3.2.3. Mathematical model of permanent magnet synchronous motor in coordinate system

The mathematical model of the permanent magnet synchronous motor in the ABC coordinate system can be transformed into any two-phase coordinate system through coordinate transformation, so that it is possible to simplify the decoupling of the motor flux linkage equation and the electromagnetic torque equation. If the mathematical model of the motor is transformed into a dqcoordinate system fixed on a permanent magnet rotor, the motor flux equation and the electromagnetic torque equation will be greatly simplified.

With the equivalent flux ψdand ψq, the equivalent inductance Ld, Lqof the motor in the dqcoordinate system, and the rotor permanent magnet flux linkage ψf, the stator flux equation can be obtained in Eq. (25):

ψd=Ldid+ψfψq=LqiqE25

Take the rotor permanent magnet flux linkage ψfas constant; the voltage of stator in the dqcoordinate system is as follows:

ud=Rid+LddiddtωrLqiquq=Riq+Lqdiqdt+ωrLdid+ωrψfE26

where udand uqare the stator-side equivalent voltages of the motor in the dqcoordinate system, Ris the stator winding resistance per phase, and ωris the electrical angular velocity of the rotor rotation.

The electromagnetic torque equation in the dqcoordinate system can be expressed as follows, where p is the number of pole pairs, ψis the flux synthesis vector, and iis the current composition vector:

Te=1.5pψ×iE27

Using the components of the dqcoordinate system to represent the flux linkage and current vector shown in Eq. (28), the electromagnetic torque can be expressed as shown in Eq. (29):

i=id+jiqψ=ψd+jψqE28
Te=1.5pψfiq+LdLqidiqE29

3.3. Servo control modeling of ball screw feed system

In order to model the servo control of the ball screw feed system, the modeling of the three-loop cascade control architecture of the vector control and servo control system of the permanent magnet synchronous servomotor is studied, which is commonly used in the ball screw feed system.

3.3.1. Modeling of permanent magnet synchronous motor vector control.

The principle of space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) is based on vector equivalents. The magnitude and direction of the current vector can be indirectly controlled by the timing of the six switching elements of the inverter through the three-phase winding of the permanent magnet synchronous motor, so that the winding produces a constant amplitude circular magnetic field that rotates according to a given demand, thus dragging the permanent magnet to rotate. The voltage inverter circuit is shown in Figure 8. The simulation model of SVPWM control system for permanent magnet synchronous motor is shown in Figure 9.

Figure 8.

Circuit of voltage bridge inverter.

Figure 9.

Simulation model of SVPWM control system.

3.3.2. Modeling of cascade control system

The SVPWM control system for permanent magnet synchronous motor is based on the three-phase current information and rotor position information fed back by the motor. AC motor is equivalent to a direct current motor by formula transformation to control the position and amplitude of the stator current.

The control system schematic is shown in Figure 10(a). The system includes a cascaded control structure with a P-position controller, a PI-velocity controller, and a PI-current controller. In the cascade control system, the servomotor feedback speed ωMand the work table feedback position XTare calculated by the rotor position detected by the encoder on the servomotor. The input Prefis given by the CNC system according to the feed motion command, the input Prefand work table feedback position XTare compared, and the reference speed ωMrefis given by the position controller. Then, the reference speed ωMrefis compared with the feedback speed ωM, and the velocity controller gives the reference current iqreffor the q-axis and the reference current idref=0for the d-axis of the stator. The three-phase current of the servomotor is detected and converted into idand iqin dqcoordinate system through the Clark and Park transformation. idrefand iqrefare compared with the feedback idand iq, respectively, and the current controller calculates the given voltages Udand Uqof the dand qaxes; then, they are converted into Uαand Uβin the αβcoordinate system by Park inverse transformation. Finally, the SVPWM module generates six-phase PWM to drive the three-phase inverter. The inverter outputs ABC three-phase voltage to servomotor stator, which generates rotating magnetic field and produces magnetic torque on the servomotor rotor. This magnetic torque is the output torque TMof the servomotor and drives the rotor to rotate under the dynamic relations of ball screw feed system.

Figure 10.

Schematic of ball screw feed drive system electromechanical co-simulation.

3.4. Electromechanical co-simulation modeling of ball screw feed drive system

Based on the lumped mass model of ball screw feed system and the servo control system simulation model, an electromechanical co-simulation model of the ball screw feed drive system was constructed. The co-simulation schematic is shown in Figure 10; as described above (a) is the semi-closed-loop cascade control system simulation model, while (b) is the lumped mass model of ball screw feed system. The inverter outputs ABC three-phase voltage to servomotor stator, which generates rotating magnetic field and produces magnetic torque on the servomotor rotor. This magnetic torque is the output torque TMof the servomotor and drives the rotor to rotate under the dynamic relations as shown in Eq. (8).

The electromechanical co-simulation model of the ball screw feed drive system is shown in Figure 11. The S_Cal module on the left side generates the trajectory command for the feed drive system according to the acceleration/deceleration strategy. Under the cascade control system, which consists of position controller, velocity controller, and current controller, the servomotor drive and the ball screw accomplish the motion command accordingly.

Figure 11.

Electromechanical co-simulation model of half-closed ball screw feed system.

4. Experimental verification of the electromechanical co-simulation model of ball screw feed drive system

The electromechanical co-simulation model in this chapter has been tested on a single-axis ball screw drive system test bench shown in Figure 12. The test bench uses an i5 CNC system and servo system of Shenyang Machine Group, which use a semi-closed-loop cascade control structure. The specifications of the test bench are listed in Table 1, which are either obtained from the manufacturers’ catalogs, approximated from prior knowledge, or calculated from computer-aided design (CAD). According to the modeling method described in Chapter 2, the lumped mass model of this ball screw feed system test bench was built up. The equivalent parameters of the lumped mass model were calculated by using the specifications in Table 1, and the other calculated lumped parameters are listed in Table 2.

Figure 12.

Single-axis ball screw feed drive test bench.

Figure 13.

Bode diagram of the lumped parameter model of ball screw feed system.

Parameter of the componentValueParameter of the componentValue
Work table mass MT(kg)206Rotary inertia of coupling JC(kgm2)1.09×104
Base mass MB(kg)3820Rotary inertia of motor JM(kgm2)6.75×103
Coupling mass Mc(kg)1.18Torsional rigidity of coupling kc(N/m)1.4×103
Motor rotor mass Mm(kg)10.9Screw bearing rigidity kb(N/m)1×108
Screw pitch length h(m)1.6×102Nut reference rigidity K(N/m)6.12×108
Screw diameter ds(m)2.5×102Nut basic dynamic load Ca(N)37.4
Screw length ls(m)1Ball screw length at table position ln(m)0.35

Table 1.

Specifications of the test bench.

Parameter of the componentValueParameter of the componentValue
Screw equivalent mass MS(kg)11.28Equivalent rotary inertia of screw JS(kgm2)1.7×103
Axial rigidity of screw Kax(N/m)0.743×108Rotary rigidity of screw Krot(Nmrad1)3.14×103
Axial rigidity of base KB(N/m)1×108Contact rigidity of the screw nut Kn(N/m)9.8×107

Table 2.

Calculated parameters used in the lumped mass model of test bench.

Taking the servomotor torque as input and the axial acceleration of work table as output, the frequency response characteristics of the lumped parameter model of the test bench are analyzed. The bode diagram is shown in Figure 13, and simulation result shows that the work table has four-order natural frequencies, which are 26.2, 76.7, 247, and 633 Hz. Further study shows that 76.7 Hz is the main axial vibration frequency of the work table, 26.2 Hz is the main axial vibration frequency of the base, and 247 and 633 Hz are the rotational vibration frequencies.

To establish the simulation model of servo control system, the servomotor parameters are needed as shown in Table 3.

Parameter nameValueParameter nameValue
Rated power kW4.4Number of pole pairs4
Rated torque Nm18.6Stator resistance per phase Ω1.44
Rotor inertia kgm26.75×103Inductance Ld, LqH8.15×103
Rated speed r/min1500Permanent magnetic flux ψfwb0.21

Table 3.

Parameters of the servomotor.

In order to compare and verify the simulation results with the experimental results, the motion command parameters and the control parameters of the experimental test and simulation are set in Table 4.

Parameter nameValueParameter nameValue
Position instruction mm400Position loop gain kp50
Maximum velocity mm/s400Velocity loop gain kv10
Maximum acceleration mm/s22000Current loop gain ki30
Maximum jerk mm/s320,000

Table 4.

Motion command parameters and the control parameters settings.

Using the same operation parameters as set in the simulation model, a feed motion experiment was conducted and the work table position was measured. The simulation results are compared to the experimental results. Figures 14 and 15 exemplarily show simulated and measured reference velocity and feedback velocity of the servomotor at the given operating conditions. The simulation result has a similar curve to the experimental result.

Figure 14.

Reference velocity and feedback velocity.

Figure 15.

Detailed reference velocity and feedback velocity.

Figure 16 shows frequency contents of the work table acceleration signals from simulation result and the experimental result. Comparing the simulation result with the experimental result, the co-simulation model of ball screw feed drive system can predict the vibration that occurs in the feed operation. Both results show that in this case the second-order natural frequency (about 75 Hz) but not the first-order natural frequency is the main factor influencing the performance of feed drive system.

Figure 16.

Frequency contents of work table acceleration.

5. Conclusions

In this chapter an electromechanical co-simulation model of the ball screw feed drive system was constructed based on lumped mass model of ball screw feed system and the servo control system simulation model, which can be used to study the dynamic characteristics and vibration behavior of the feed drive system. Simulative and experimental tests were conducted based on a ball screw feed drive system test bench. The result shows that the co-simulation model of ball screw feed drive system can predict the vibration that occurs in the feed operation. Because of the integration of lumped parameter model into the detailed modeled cascade control simulation model, the electromechanical co-simulation of ball screw feed drive system could achieve a very good predictability for control performance and vibration behavior study of ball screw feed drive system, which may be affected by the servo controller, ball screw feed system, or the coupling between them.

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the major national science and technology projects “high-end CNC machine tools and basic manufacturing equipment” (2012ZX04005031).

© 2018 The Author(s). Licensee IntechOpen. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Liang Luo and Weimin Zhang (November 5th 2018). Electromechanical Co-Simulation for Ball Screw Feed Drive System, New Trends in Industrial Automation, Pengzhong Li, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.80716. Available from:

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