Open access peer-reviewed chapter

Conclusion

By Ivo Čáp, Klára Čápová, Milan Smetana and Štefan Borik

Reviewed: November 16th 2021Published: December 24th 2021

DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.101654

Downloaded: 36

1. To conclude

This textbook aims to acquaint students and those interested in the field of use of technology in medicine with the elementary principles of operation of devices and tools based on the use of various wave phenomena.

In addition to the basic principles, this publication lists and explains some simple applications encountered in the field of biomedicine. However, modern science and technology provide many new sophisticated technical tools that go beyond the scope of this textbook. These are mainly devices of radiology and nuclear medicine. These are also applications of wave processes but in conjunction with sophisticated computational methods that require a more detailed explanation. These are mainly acoustic and optical imaging methods, USG, thermography, tomographic imaging methods, such as CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, and other methodologies, which use radioactive radiation in therapy and diagnostics. The description of these advanced methods will be the content of the prepared book - Technical means of biomedical engineering.

The present textbook uses basic knowledge of mathematics and physics. Special medical applications are going out of the personal experience of authors and current books and journals. Part of the information and most of the documentary images are from publicly available and freely usable Internet sources.

Advertisement

List of used symbols

A

voltage transmission (−)

A

complex voltage transmission (−)

b

oscillation damping coefficient (s−1)

B

magnetic induction (T)

c

phase velocity (m∙s−1), speed of light (m∙s−1)

c0

speed of light in free space (c0 = 299,792,458 m∙s−1 exactly)

C

capacitance (F)

D

electric displacement (C∙m−2)

e

elementary charge (e = 1,602,177 × 10−19 C)

eV

electron-volt unit (1 eV = 1,602,177 × 10−19 J)

eEM

electromagnetic field energy density (J∙m−3)

E

energy (J, eV), e.g., Ep potential, Ek kinetic

E

illuminance (lx)

E

electric field strength (V∙m−1)

f

frequency (Hz), focal length (m)

fL

Larmor frequency (Hz)

F

force vector (N)

g

gravity acceleration (m∙s−2)

h

Planck’s constant (h = 6,626,070 × 10–34 J∙s)

H

loudness level (Ph – phon, dB)

H

magnetic field strength (A∙m−1)

i

electric current (A)

I

phasor of electric current (A)

I

rms value of electric current (A), luminous intensity (cd)

I

power density of wave (radiation) (W∙m−2), IdB intensity level (dB)

j

imaginary unit (j = √−1)

J

current density (A∙m−2)

k

complex wave number (m−1)

l

length (m)

L

inductance (H), luminance (cd∙m−2)

L

angular momentum (N∙m∙s)

m

mass (kg)

m

magnetic dipole moment (N∙m∙T−1)

M

torque (N∙m)

n

refractive index (−)

p

pressure (Pa), power density (W∙m−3)

pa

acoustic pressure (Pa)

p

linear momentum (kg∙m∙s−1)

P

power (W), active power (W)

Q

electric charge (C), quality factor (−), reactive power (Var)

r

radius (m), distance (m)

r

wave reflection factor (−)

r

position vector (m)

R

electrical resistance (Ω)

S

apparent power (VA), area (m2)

S

complex power of the alternating current (VA)

t

time (s)

t

wave transition factor (−)

T

period (s), thermodynamic temperature (K)

u

voltage (V), acoustic displacement (m)

U

rms value of electric voltage (V)

U

voltage phasor (V)

v

velocity vector (m∙s−1)

V

volume (m3)

W

work (J)

xm

amplitude of oscillations (m)

x

coordinate (m), axis designation, displacement in the x- axis direction

y

coordinate (m), axis designation

z

coordinate (m), axis designation

Z

impedance, wave impedance (Ω)

Z

complex impedance (Ω)

α

wavenumber (m−1), angle (rad),

β

wave attenuation coefficient (m−1), angle (rad)

δ

effective wave propagation length (m), wave penetration depth (m)

γ

conductivity (S∙m−1), gyromagnetic ratio (s−1∙T−1)

ε

electric permittivity (F∙m−1), strain (−)

ε0

electric permittivity of free space (ε0 = 8,854,187 × 10−12 F∙m−1)

εr

relative permittivity (−)

λ

wavelength (m)

φ

plane angle (rad), phase shift (rad)

ρ

bulk density (kg∙m−3), electric charge density (C∙m−3)

μ

magnetic permeability (H∙m−1)

μ0

permeability of free space (μ0 = 4π × 10−7 H∙m−1)

μr

relative permeability (−)

Π

Poynting vector (W∙m−2)

τ

time constant (s)

τ

mechanical stress in shear (Pa)

σ

mechanical tensile stress (Pa)

Φ

magnetic flux (Wb), luminous flux (lm)

Φe

radiation flux density (W∙m−2)

ω

angular frequency (s−1), angular velocity (rad∙s−1)

ωL

Larmor angular frequency (s−1)

Ω

angular frequency of forced oscillations (s−1), solid angle (sr)

x.=dxdt

designation of the first derivative by time

x¨=d2xdt2

designation of the second derivative by time

a, A

designation of a scalar quantity

a, A

designation of a vector quantity

a, A

designation of a complex quantity

Advertisement

Abbreviations

CCD

detection chip (Charge-Coupled Device)

CMOS

detection chip (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor)

CMYK

subtractive colour composition (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Black)

CNT

Carbon Nano Tubes

CT

Computed Tomography

EM

electromagnetic

FID

magnetic resonance signal (Free Induction Decay)

IR

Infra-Red

LASER

Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation

LCD

Liquid Crystals Display

LED

Light Emitting Diode

MR

Magnetic Resonance

MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

MRS

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

MW

Micro-Waves

PAM

Photo-Acoustic Microscopy

PET

Positron Emission Tomography

RGB

additive colour composition (Red-Green-Blue)

RF, RW

Radiofrequency, Radio-Waves

SPECT

Single Photon Emission Tomography

USG

Ultrasonography

UV

Ultra-Violet

UHF

Ultra-High Frequency

VSW

Very Short Waves

WIFI

wireless connection (Wireless Fidelity)

VL

Visible Light

X

X-rays (Roentgen radiation)

γ

gamma radiation

2D, 3D

two-, three-dimensional

© 2021 The Author(s). Licensee IntechOpen. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction for non-commercial purposes, provided the original is properly cited.

How to cite and reference

Link to this chapter Copy to clipboard

Cite this chapter Copy to clipboard

Ivo Čáp, Klára Čápová, Milan Smetana and Štefan Borik (December 24th 2021). Conclusion, Electromagnetic and Acoustic Waves in Bioengineering Applications, Ivo Čáp, Klára Čápová, Milan Smetana and Štefan Borik, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.101654. Available from:

chapter statistics

36total chapter downloads

More statistics for editors and authors

Login to your personal dashboard for more detailed statistics on your publications.

Access personal reporting

Related Content

This Book

Electromagnetic and Acoustic Waves in Bioengineering Applications

Authored by Ivo Čáp

Next chapter

Electromagnetic and Acoustic Waves in Bioengineering Applications

By Ivo Čáp, Klára Čápová, Milan Smetana and Štefan Borik

Related Book

First chapter

Applications of Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques: A State-of-the-Art Review

By Suvanjan Bhattacharyya, Devendra K. Vishwakarma, Sanghati Roy, Ranjib Biswas and Mohammad Moghimi Ardekani

We are IntechOpen, the world's leading publisher of Open Access books. Built by scientists, for scientists. Our readership spans scientists, professors, researchers, librarians, and students, as well as business professionals. We share our knowledge and peer-reveiwed research papers with libraries, scientific and engineering societies, and also work with corporate R&D departments and government entities.

More About Us