Stavropoula Tjoumakaris

Stavropoula I. Tjoumakaris, MD, is originally from Thessaloniki, Greece. She graduated in Biology with Minors in Physics and Chemistry from Richard Stockton College, Pomona, New Jersey, with Distinction and earned Class Salutatorian Highest Honors. She obtained her medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and received numerous academic distinctions including membership in the prestigious Alpha Omega Honor Society. She completed her Neurological Surgery Residency and advanced Fellowship training in Cerebrovascular Surgery and Endovascular Neurosurgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She is one of the first and few dual-trained female Cerebrovascular Neurosurgeons in the United States. Dr. Tjoumakaris has been recognized throughout her academic career for both scholastic excellence and a genuine devotion to patient care. She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and has lectured internationally on cerebrovascular surgery. She is an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Associate Residency Program Director. Dr. Tjoumakaris is a leader in the diagnosis and management of stroke, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and cerebrovascular disease.

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Arteriovenous fistulas are shunts between arteries and veins that can be found in many organs of the human body such as the brain, skin, eye and lung. These lesions can be symptomatic by causing ischemia, through the process of the steal phenomenon, or vascular congestion and subsequent hemorrhage, eg. intracerebral hemorrhage of a ruptured dural arteriovenous fistula. The etiology of these lesions is not fully understood, some are congenital and others are acquired. On the other hand, iatrogenic arteriovenous fistulas, such as in hemodialysis patients, can be a life-saving procedure. This book provides a clear and concise review of the diagnosis and management of arteriovenous fistulas throughout the human body. It could be a great resource to medical students, residents, fellows, professors and researchers in the field.

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