Shafigh Mehraeen

University of Illinois at Chicago

Shafigh Mehraeen is an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, both from Stanford University under the supervision of Andrew Spakowitz. For his Ph.D., he studied the impact of molecular elasticity on the behavior of semi-flexible polymers and protein self-assembly. As a postdoctoral scholar, he studied the impact of active layer morphology on bimolecular recombination losses in organic photovoltaics, and transition state theory under the supervision of Jean-Luc Bredas at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Jianshu Cao at MIT, respectively. He has published three books, more than 30 scientific papers, and served as a reviewer for major scientific journals. His current research focuses on applying molecular simulations, atomistic modeling, and density functional theory to address directed self-assembly of nanoparticles on templated surfaces, photochemistry of organic solar cells, and polymer and electrocatalyst design using machine learning and artificial intelligence.

1books edited

2chapters authored

Latest work with IntechOpen by Shafigh Mehraeen

Top-down approaches are currently the main contributor of fabricating microelectronic devices. However, the prohibitive cost of numerous technological steps in these approaches is the main obstacle to further progress. Furthermore, a large number of applications necessitate fabrication of complex and ultra-small devices that cannot be made using these approaches. New approaches based on natural self-assembly of matter need to be developed to allow for fabrication of micro and nanoelectronic devices. Self-assembly of nanostructures is a dynamic field, which explores physics of these structures and new ways to fabricate them. However, the major problem is how to control the properties of the nanostructures resulting from low dimensionality. This book presents recent advances made to address this problem, and fabricate nanostructures using self-assembly.

Go to the book