Andrei Surguchov

Kansas University Medical Center

Andrei Surguchov joined Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, as a faculty member in 1992, where he studied the mechanisms of the genetic control of lipid metabolism. At the University of Utah, his research interests were focused on the cloning of new genes encoding retinal proteins. At Washington University, St. Louis, he studied molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and retinal degeneration. Currently, his research focuses on the structure-function relationship of proteins involved in neurodegeneration and ocular diseases. Using different animal and cellular models, his laboratory is studying the role of naturally unfolded proteins, their transcriptional regulation, processing, and posttranslational modifications. Recently, he became interested in the role of micro-RNA in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Other areas of research involve the studies of synuclein family members, protein misfolding and the regulation of metalloproteinases.

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Latest work with IntechOpen by Andrei Surguchov

Neurodegenerative diseases are debilitating conditions that result in degeneration and death of nerve cells. A significant group of these diseases is the synucleinopathies, which are characterized by the accumulation of aggregates of alpha-synuclein in neurons, nerve fibers, or glial cells. There are three main types of synucleinopathies: Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Synucleins are small, naturally unfolded proteins prone to aggregate and form intracellular inclusions, which impair normal cellular functions. This book presents new data on synuclein aggregation and its effect on cholesterol transport. It also discusses the role of genetic contribution to these diseases and approaches to inhibition of synuclein aggregation.

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