Open access peer-reviewed chapter

Performance Analysis for NOMA Relaying System in Next-Generation Networks with RF Energy Harvesting

By Dac-Binh Ha and Jai P. Agrawal

Submitted: April 5th 2019Reviewed: August 20th 2019Published: October 31st 2019

DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.89253

Downloaded: 270

Abstract

In this chapter, we investigate the performance of the non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) relaying network with radio-frequency (RF) power transfer. Specifically, this considered system consists of one RF power supply station, one source, one energy-constrained relay, and multiple energy-constrained NOMA users. The better user and relay can help the source to forward the message to worse user by using the energy harvested from the power station. The triple-phase harvest-transmit-forward transmission protocol is proposed for this considered system. The exact closed-form expressions of outage probability and throughput for each link and whole system are derived by using the statistical characteristics of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of transmission links. In order to understand more detail about the behavior of this considered system, the numerical results are provided according to the system key parameters, such as the transmit power, number of users, time switching ratio, and power allocation coefficients. The simulation results are also provided to confirm the correctness of our analysis.

Keywords

  • outage probability
  • non-orthogonal multiple access
  • relaying
  • radio frequency
  • wireless energy harvesting

1. Introduction

Radio-frequency (RF) energy harvesting (EH), abbreviated as RF-EH, enabled wireless power transfer (WPT) is an emerging and promising approach to supply everlasting and cost-effective energy to low-power electronic devices, that is, sensor nodes, low-power cellphone, wireless control devices, and so on [1, 2, 3]. This approach is expected to have abundant applications in next-generation wireless networks, such as Internet-of-Things (IoT) wireless networks or 5G networks, which can be a platform for varied fields, for example, manufacturing [4, 5], smart agriculture [5], and smart city [5]. Specifically, the IoT-based wireless sensor networks for smart agriculture usually consist of a large number of battery-powered wireless sensor nodes for data collecting, data processing, and data transmission. Therefore, these energy-constrained devices need to be replaced or recharged periodically; this leads the lifetime of network limited. The RF energy harvesting can prolong the lifetime of these networks using the energy harvested from the RF sources (e.g., base station, TV/radio broadcast station, microwave station, satellite earth station, etc.). Compared with other resources available for the EH, the RF power is easy to be converted. Therefore, RF energy harvesting is the solution to enhance the system energy efficiency in the energy-constrained networks, including network lifetime; reduction of carbon footprint, without requiring battery replacement; easy and fast deployment in complicated or toxic environments; etc. In the past few years, there have been a number of works on RF energy harvesting communications, and the main works focused on the development of energy harvesting models, protocols, transmission schemes, and security in communication systems [1, 2, 3]. In practice, RF-EH can be operated in a time switching (TS) scheme in which the receiver uses a portion of time duration for energy harvesting and the remaining time for information receiving or a power splitting (PS) scheme in which the received signal power is divided into two parts for energy harvesting and information receiving, separately [6].

Relaying communication technique can mitigate the wireless channel fading and improve the reliability of wireless links by exploiting the spatial diversity gains inherent in multiple user environments [7]. This can be achieved by using collaboration of relay nodes to form virtual multiple input multiple output (MIMO) without the need of multiple antennas at each node. Figure 1 depicts a system model of cooperative network. We can observe from this figure that the destination D can receive two signals from direct link and relaying link. It means that D has more opportunities to decode its own message; thus the performance of this system can be improved. There are two schemes of relaying technique: amplify-and-forward (AF) or decode-and-forward (DF). In AF relaying scheme, the relay simply sends a scaled copy of the received noisy signal to the destination, while in DF relaying scheme, the relay transmits a re-encoded copy to the destination, if the relay can successfully decode the transmitted message. In wireless relaying networks (e.g., energy-constrained wireless sensor networks), the relay nodes (e.g., cluster head nodes) are often subject to space limitation to equip a large battery for long lifetime using [8]. Thus, RF energy harvesting technique has been applied for this type of relay nodes to not only improve the throughput and reliability by exploiting the virtual spatial diversity but also promise everlasting network lifetime without requiring battery replacement. Due to the new imposed time-varying energy constraints, several technical issues, such as relaying protocols, power allocation, energy-information tradeoff, relay selection, cooperative spectrum sensing and sharing, security, etc., have been investigated for various relaying network models [6, 9, 10]. The challenges in these works become more complicated because the harvested energy varies according to channel fading, and the energy usage overtime needs to make a tradeoff between energy harvesting time and information processing time.

Figure 1.

A system model of cooperative network.

The next-generation networks (5G and beyond) are supported with very high data rate, ultralow latency, massive connections, and very high mobility to satisfy the fast-increasing users and demands. To fulfill these targets, the relaying and non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) techniques are proposed to extend the coverage of network, improve the performance, achieve high spectral efficiency, and support dense networks [11]. In NOMA scheme, the source superposes all messages before transmitting them to users as Figure 2. In this figure, we can see that the near receiver (or better user) uses successive interference cancelation (SIC) to obtain the far user’s message first (due to it is allocated with more transmit power) and subtracts this component from the received signal to obtain its own message. Compared to conventional orthogonal multiple access (OMA), for example, frequency division multiple access (FDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), and code division multiple access (CDMA), NOMA simultaneously serves multiple user equipment on the same resource blocks by splitting users into power domain [11]; therefore it can improve spectral efficiency of wireless network.

Figure 2.

Illustration of NOMA.

The above three techniques (i.e., RF-EH, relaying, NOMA) can be integrated into next-generation networks. However, there are many related issues that need to be addressed before these techniques can be deployed in next-generation networks, such as the network architecture, power allocation, relaying scheme selection, the combination between NOMA and other multiple access methods, fixed or dynamic user pairing/clustering, optimal user allocation and beamforming in NOMA MIMO systems, the impact of imperfect CSI, and joint optimization of diverse aspects of NOMA (spectrum efficiency, energy efficiency, security) [11]. In recent years, a number of works investigated some related issues such as performance of energy harvesting DF/AF relaying, cooperative, cognitive, and MIMO NOMA networks [12, 13, 14, 15]. In addition, the work of [16] studied the secrecy performance of MIMO NOMA system over Nakagami-mchannels with transmit antenna selection protocol. However, almost in these works the information sources are assumed that it can transmit RF energy and information by using TS or PS scheme.

Different from the above works, in this chapter we investigate the cooperative NOMA network in which the power station and information source (e.g., base station) are separated and the energy-constrained user nodes collaborate with the energy-constrained relay nodes to help source forward the information to destinations. The main contributions of this chapter are as follows:

  • The triple-phase harvest-transmit-forward transmission protocol is proposed for this considered system.

  • The exact closed-form expressions of outage probability and throughput for each link and whole system are derived by using the statistical characteristics of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of transmission links.

  • In terms of outage probability, the numerical results are provided according to the system key parameters, such as the transmit power, number of users, time switching ratio, and power allocation coefficients to look insight this considered system.

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2. System and channel model description

Figure 3 depicts the system model for RF-EH NOMA relaying network, in which the power station (P) intends to transfer energy to energy-constrained relay (R) and energy-constrained destination nodes (D); information source (S) intends transmit the information to destinations by the help of relay node R.

Figure 3.

System model for RF-EH NOMA relaying network.

Notation: Denote P, S, R, and Das power station, information source, relay, and destination, respectively. |hSDm|2 and |hSDn|2 are denoted as the ordered channel gains of the mth user and the nth user, respectively. Denote |hPR|2, |hPDm|2, |hSR|2, |hRDn|2, and |hmn|2 as the channel gains of the links PR, PDm, SR, RDn, and Dm—Dn, respectively. Denote dPR, dPDm, dSR, dRDn, dSDm, and dmnas the Euclidean distances of P—R,P—Dm,S—R,S—Dm,R—Dn, and Dm—Dn, respectively. Symbol θis denoted as the path loss exponent. Let X1 = |hPDm|2, Y1 = |hPR|2, X2 = |hSDm|2, Y2 = |hSR|2, X3 = |hmn|2, and Y3 = |hRDn|2.

In this system, NOMA scheme is applied for Mdestination users in pair division manner, such as {Dm, Dn} with m < n[17]. Without loss of generality, we assume that all the channel power gains between Sand Di(1 ≤ i ≤ M) follow the following order: |hSD1|2 ≥ … ≥ |hSDm|2 ≥ |hSDn|2 ≥ … ≥ |hSDM|2.

The scenario of this considered system is investigated as follows:

  • Due to the severe shadowing environment, the worse node (i.e., Dn) cannot detect message signal transmitted from S. Thus, the better node (i.e., Dm) or relay node Ris selected to help Sforwarding the message signal to worse node.

  • All the transceivers are equipped by single antenna and operate in half duplex mode.

  • All wireless links are assumed to undergo independent frequency nonselective Rayleigh block fading and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN).

  • The power gains of all links are modeled by random variables with zero mean and the same variance σ2, that is, ∼CN(0,σ2).

In this work, we propose a triple-phase harvest-transmit-forward transmission protocol for this RF-EH NOMA relaying system as shown in Figure 4:

  1. In the first phase (power transfer phase): P transfers RF energy to the users with power P0 in the time αT(0 ≤ α ≤ 1, time switching ratio; T, block time for each transmission).

  2. In the second phase (information transmitting phase): S uses power PSto transmit superimposed message signal

Figure 4.

The triple-phase protocol for RF-EH NOMA relaying network.

x=amsm+ansnE1

to user pair (Dm, Dn) in the time of (1−α)T/2, where smand snare the message for the mth user Dmand the nth user Dn, respectively, and amand anare the power allocation coefficients which satisfied the conditions: 0 < am < anand am + an = 1 by following the NOMA scheme. By applying NOMA, Dm uses SIC to detect message snand subtracts this component from the received signal to obtain its own message sm.

  1. 3. In the third phase (information relaying phase): in this phase, Dmre-encodes and forwards snto Dnin the remaining time of (1−α)T/2 with the energy harvested from P. At the same time, relay decodes xand forwards xto Dn.

Finally, Dncombines two received signals, that is, the relaying signals from Dmand R, to decode its own message by using selection combining (SC) scheme.

For more detailed purpose, we continue to present the transmission of this protocol for RF-EH NOMA relaying system in mathematical manner.

2.1 Power transfer phase

In this phase, the energy of Dmand R harvested from P in the time of αTcan be respectively expressed as

E1=ηP0hPDm2αTdPDmθ,E2
E2=ηP0hPR2αTdPRθ,E3

where ηis the energy conversion efficiency (0 ≤ η ≤ 1).

2.2 Information transmitting phase

In this duration of (1−α)T/2, the source Sbroadcasts superimposed message signal xas Eq. (1) to the user pair and relay. The received signal at Dmis written as

ySDm=PSdSDmθamsm+ansnhSDm+nSDm,E4

where nSDm ∼ CN(0,σ2) is AWGN.

Similarly, the received signal at R is expressed as

ySR=PSdSRθamsm+ansnhSR+nSR,E5

where nSR ∼ CN(0,σ2) are AWGN.

Applying NOMA, Dmuses SIC to detect message snand subtracts this component from the received signal to obtain its own message sm. Therefore, the instantaneous SINR at Dmto detect smand sntransmitted from S can be respectively given by

γSDmsn=anγShSDm2amγShSDm2+dSDmθ=b2X2b1X2+1,E6
γSDmsm=amγShSDm2dSDmθ=b1X2,E7
whereγS=PSσ2,b1=amγSdSDmθ,b2=anγSdSDmθ.

And in the meanwhile the relay applying DF scheme first decodes its received signal from S to obtain superimposed message xand then re-encodes and forwards it to the destination. Therefore, in this phase the instantaneous SNR at R to detect xtransmitted from S can be given by

γSRx=γShSR2dSRθ=b3Y2,E8
whereb3=γSdSRθ.

2.3 Information relaying phase

In this phase, Dmand Rspend the harvested energy E1 and E2, respectively, as Eqs. (2) and (3) to forward received signals to Dnin duration of (1−α)T/2. Notice that we ignore the processing power required by the transmit/receive circuitry of Dmand R. Therefore, the transmit power of Dmand Ris respectively given by

P1=2ηαP0hPDm21αdPDmθ,E9
P2=2ηαP0hPR21αdPRθ.E10

The received signals at Dnthat are transmitted from Dmand Rare, respectively, expressed as

yDmDn=P1dmnθsnhmn+nmn,E11

where nmn∼ CN(0,σ2), and

yRDn=P2dRDnθamsm+ansnhRDn+nRDn,E12

where nRDn∼ CN(0,σ2).

Because Dnapplies SC scheme, the instantaneous SNR/SINR at Dnto detect sntransmitted from S can be given by

γDnsn=max2ηαγ0hPDm2hmn21αdPDmθdmnθ2ηαanγ01αdPRθhPR2hRDn2amγ0hRDn2+dRDnθ=maxc1X1X3c2Y1Y3c3Y3+1,E13
whereγ0=P0σ2,c1=2ηαγ01αdPDmθdmnθ,c2=2ηαanγ01αdPRθdRDnθ,c3=amγ0dRDnθ.

The independent and identically distributed (IID) Rayleigh channel gains (X1, Y1, X2, Y2, X3, Y3) follow exponential distributions with parameters λ1, λ2, λ3, λ4, λ5, and λ6, respectively. According to [18], the cumulative distribution function (CDF) and the probability density function (PDF) of ordered random variable X2 are respectively written as follows

FX2x=M!Mm!m1!k=0m1Ckm11kMm+k+11exMm+k+1λ3,E14
fX2x=M!Mm!m1!1λ3k=0m1Ckm11kexMm+k+1λ3.E15

Because all links undergo Rayleigh fading, the PDF and CDF of random variable V ∈{X1, Y1, Y2, X3, Y3} have the following forms:

fVx=1λexλ,E16
FVx=1exλ,E17

where λ ∈ {λ1, λ2, λ4, λ5, λ6}.

3. Performance analysis

3.1 Outage probability

Outage probability is an important performance metric for system designers [12]. It is generally used to characterize a wireless communication system and defined as the probability that the instantaneous end-to-end SNR (γe2e) falls below the predetermined threshold γth(γth = 2Ω−1, where Ω is fixed transmission rate at the source), given by

Pout=Prγe2e<γth.E18

In this considered system, the outage event at the destination occurs when Dmcannot detect successfully snor smor when Dmcan detect successfully snand sm, but an outage occurs in information relaying phase. Accordingly, outage probability of this RF-EH NOMA relaying system is written as

Pout=Pr(γSDmsn<γth)+Pr(γSDmsn>γth,γSDmsm<γth)+Pr(γSDmsn>γth,γSDmsm>γth)Pr(γDnsn<γth).E19

Notice that because the messages are transmitted in the duration of (1−α)T/2, thus γthis calculated by γth = 22Ω/(1−α) − 1, where Ω is fixed source transmission rate.

Substituting Eqs. (6), (7), and (13) into Eq. (19), we obtain the following equation:

Pout=Prb2X2b1X2+1<γth+Prb2X2b1X2+1>γthb1X2<γth+Prb2X2b1X2+1>γthb1X2>γthPrc1X1X3<γth×Prb3Y2<γth+1Prb3Y2<γthPrc2Y1Y3c3Y3+1<γth=I1+I2+I3I4I5+1I5I6,E20

where

I1=Prb2X2b1X2+1<γth,E21
I2=Prb2X2b1X2+1>γthb1X2<γth,E22
I3=Prb2X2b1X2+1>γthb1X2>γth,E23
I4=Prc1X1X3<γth,E24
I5=Prb3Y2<γth,E25
I6=Prc2Y1Y3c3Y3+1<γth.E26

By the help of Eqs. (14)(17), we obtain the exact closed-form expressions of I1, I2, I3, I4, I5, and I6, respectively, as follows:

I1=1,γth>anamFX2γthb2b1γth,γth<anam=1,γth>anam.M!Mm!m1!k=0m1Ckm11kMm+k+11eMm+k+1γthλ3b2b1γth,γth<anam.E27
I2=FX2γthb1FX2γthb2b1γth,γth<anam10,γth>anam1=M!Mm!m1!k=0m1Ckm11kMm+k+1eMm+k+1γthλ3b2b1γtheMm+k+1γthλ3b1,γth<anam1.0,γth>anam1.E28
I3=1FX2γthb1,γth<anam11FX2γthb2b1γth,anam1<γth<anam0,γth>anam=1M!Mm!m1!k=0m1Ckm11kMm+k+11eMm+k+1γthλ3b1,γth<anam1.1M!Mm!m1!k=0m1Ckm11kMm+k+11eMm+k+1γthλ3b2b1γth,anam1<γth<anam.0,γth>anam.E29
I4=PrX3<γthc1X1=0FX3γthc1zfX1zdz=01eγthλ5c1z1λ1ezλ1dz=12γthλ1λ5c1K12γthλ1λ5c1.E30
I5=1eγthλ4b3.E31
I6=PrY3<c3γthc2+PrY3<γthc2Y1c3γthY1>c3γthc2=FY3c3γthc2+c3γthc2FY3γthc2zc3γthfY1zdz=12ec3γthλ2c2γthλ2λ6c2K12γthλ2λ6c2.E32

Notice that Kνis the modified Bessel function of the second kind and νth order [19].

Substituting Eqs. (27)(32) into Eq. (20), we obtain the exact closed-form expression of outage probability for this RF-EH NOMA relaying system as follows:

Pout=I1+I2+I3I4I5+1I5I6,γth<anam1.I1+I3I4I5+1I5I6,anam1<γth<anam.1,γth>anam.E33

3.2 Throughput

At this point, we analyze throughput (Φ) at the destination node for delay-limited transmission mode. It is found out by evaluating outage probability at a fixed source transmission rate—Ω bps/Hz. We observe that the source transmit information at the rate of Ω bps/Hz and the effective communication time from the source to the destination in the block time T is (1-α)T/2. Therefore, throughput Φ at the destination is defined as follows:

Φ=1PoutΩ1αT/2T=1α1PoutΩ2.E34

Substituting the result of Poutas Eq. (33) in Section 3.1 into Eq. (34), we obtain the exact closed-form expression of throughput for this RF-EH NOMA relaying system.

These derivations are similar to [20]. By using these expressions for programming, we can investigate the behaviors of this considered system, and then we can adjust the inputs to achieve the optimal performance for this network.

4. Numerical results and discussion

In this section, we provide the numerical results according to the system key parameters (i.e., the average transmit SNR γ0 and γS, number of users, time switching ratio, and power allocation coefficients) to clarify the performance of proposed protocol for this considered RF-EH NOMA relaying system. Furthermore, we also provide Monte Carlo simulation results to verify our analytical results. The simulation parameters are shown in Table 1.

ParametersSystem values
EnvironmentRayleigh
Number of antennas of each node1
Fixed rate (Ω)1 bps/Hz
Number of users (M)4, 6, 8
Energy conversion efficiency (η)0.9
Distances (d)1
Path loss exponent (θ)2

Table 1.

Simulation parameters.

Figure 5 depicts Poutof this considered system versus the average transmit power of power station with different numbers of users M. This figure shows that when we increase the transmit power of power station P, Poutof this system decreases. Similarly, Figure 6 shows the variation of throughput with respect to γ0 for different values of M. This figure also shows that the throughput of this system increases when increasing transmit power of power station P. These mean that we can improve the performance by increasing transmit power to provide more energy to users or reducing the NOMA of users.

Figure 5.

Pout vs. average transmit SNR of P with different numbers of users M with γS = 20 dB, an = 0.9, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.3, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Figure 6.

Throughput Φ vs. average transmit SNR of P with different numbers of users M with γS = 20 dB, an = 0.9, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.3, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Figures 7 and 8 plot the curves of Poutand throughput Φ of this system versus time switching ratio for different values of average transmit power of S, respectively. From these figures, we found that when the time switching ratio α is small, α increases, then Poutdecreases, and Φ increases. This can be explained by that there is more time for the user and relay to harvest energy as α grows. When α continues to increase, Poutinversely increases, and Φ decreases. The reason is that there is less time for message transmission phases when α is greater than α value. When α is greater than 1 − 2Ω/log2(an/am + 1), then Poutreaches 1. From this analysis, there exists a specific value of α that leads Poutto obtain the lowest value and leads Φ to reach the highest value. Obviously, we can select the best time switching ratio α to achieve the optimal performance of this system. From these figures, we also found that the performance of this system can be improved by increasing the transmit power of source S.

Figure 7.

Pout with respect to time switching ratio for different values of average transmit SNR of S with γ0 = 20 dB, M = 8, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, an = 0.9, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Figure 8.

Throughput Φ with respect to time switching ratio for different values of average transmit SNR of S with γ0 = 20 dB, M = 8, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, an = 0.9, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Figures 9 and 10 show the variation of Poutand throughput Φ with respect to power allocation coefficient an for different values of average transmit SNR of S, respectively. From these figures, we can see that when an → 1, the performance of this system degrades. Due to the constrain of γth(i.e., γth = 22Ω/(1−α)−1 < an/am), by the given value of R and α, the Poutreaches 1 when an/am < 22Ω/(1−α)−1. According to these figures, the performance can be improved when an → 0.89 for Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.1. In order to improve the performance of this system, we can allocate more transmit power for the worse user’s message (i.e., sn). However, at that time the power which leaves for the better user’s message (i.e., sm) will be smaller, and it should satisfy an/am > 22Ω/(1−α)−1.

Figure 9.

Pout with respect to power allocation coefficient an for different values of average transmit SNR of S with γ0 = 20 dB, M = 8, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.1, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Figure 10.

Throughput Φ with respect to power allocation coefficient for different values of average transmit SNR of S with γ0 = 20 dB, M = 8, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.1, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

In addition, Figure 11 plots the curves of Poutwith and without relay versus average transmit SNR of power station Pwith different numbers of users M. In this figure, we can observe that Poutof relaying scheme is lower than Poutwithout relaying. In other words, this result confirms that relaying method can improve the performance of this considered system.

Figure 11.

Pout with and without relay vs. average transmit SNR of P with different numbers of users M with γS = 20 dB, an = 0.9, m = 2, n = 3, Ω = 1 bps/Hz, α = 0.3, η = 0.9, dPDm = dPR = dSDm = dSR = dmn = dRDn = 1, θ = 2.

Finally, we can observe from the above figures that the analysis and simulation results are good matching. This confirms the correctness of our analysis.

5. Conclusions

In this chapter, we have presented the performance analysis of downlink RF-EH NOMA relaying network with triple-phase harvest-transmit-forward transmission protocol in terms of outage probability and throughput. The exact closed-form expressions of outage probability and throughput for this proposed system have been derived. We have found that the performance of this considered system is enhanced by applying relaying technique or increasing the transmit power for energy harvesting and/or increasing the transmit power for information transmission. Moreover, the existence of best time switching ratio is proven to achieve the optimal performance of this system. We will solve the best time switching ratio searching problem in the future work.

© 2019 The Author(s). Licensee IntechOpen. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Dac-Binh Ha and Jai P. Agrawal (October 31st 2019). Performance Analysis for NOMA Relaying System in Next-Generation Networks with RF Energy Harvesting, Recent Wireless Power Transfer Technologies, Pedro Pinho, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.89253. Available from:

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