Open access peer-reviewed chapter

Minimizing Torque-Ripple in Inverter-Fed Induction Motor Using Harmonic Elimination PWM Technique

By Ouahid Bouchhida, Mohamed Seghir Boucherit and Abederrezzek Cherifi

Submitted: June 8th 2011Reviewed: December 15th 2011Published: November 14th 2012

DOI: 10.5772/37883

Downloaded: 3624

1. Introduction

Vector control has been widely used for the high-performance drive of the induction motor. As in DC motor, torque control of the induction motor is achieved by controlling torque and flux components independently. Vector control techniques can be separated into two categories: direct and indirect flux vector orientation control schemes. For direct control methods, the flux vector is obtained by using stator terminal quantities, while indirect methods use the machine slip frequency to achieve field orientation.

The overall performance of field-oriented-controlled induction motor drive systems is directly related to the performance of current control. Therefore, decoupling the control scheme is required by compensation of the coupling effect between q-axis and d-axis current dynamics (Jung et al., 1999; Lin et al., 2000; Suwankawin et al., 2002).

The PWM is the interface between the control block of the electrical drive and its associated electrical motor (fig.1). This function controls the voltage or the current inverter (VSI or CSI) of the drive. The performance of the system is influenced by the PWM that becomes therefore an essential element of the system. A few problems of our days concerning the variable speed system are related to the conventional PWM: inverter switching losses, acoustical noise, and voltages harmonics (fig.2).

Harmonic elimination and control in inverter applications have been researched since the early 1960’s (Bouchhida et al., 2007, 2008; Czarkowski et al., 2002; García et al., 2003; Meghriche et al., 2004, 2005; Villarreal-Ortiz et al., 2005; Wells et al., 2004). The majority of these papers consider the harmonic elimination problem in the context of either a balanced connected load or a single phase inverter application. Typically, many papers have focused on finding solutions and have given little attention to which solution is optimal in an application context.

A pre-calculated PWM approach has been developed to minimize the harmonic ratio within the inverter output voltage (Bouchhida et al., 2007, 2008; Bouchhida, 2008, 2011). Several other techniques were proposed in order to reduce harmonic currents and voltages. Some benefit of harmonic reduction is a decrease of eddy currents and hysterisis losses. That increase of the life span of the machine winding insulation. The proposed approach is integrated within different control strategies of induction machine.

Figure 1.

Global scheme of the Induction machine control

Figure 2.

Harmonic spectrum of the PWM inverter output voltage.

A novel harmonic elimination pulse width modulated (PWM) strategy for three-phase inverter is presented in this chapter. The torque ripple of the induction motor can be significantly reduced by the new PWM technique. The three-phase inverter is associated with a passive LC filter. The commutation angles are predetermined off-line and stored in the microcontroller memory in order to speed up the online control of the induction motors. Pre-calculated switching is modelled to cancel the greater part of low-order harmonics and to keep a single-pole DC voltage across the polarized capacitors. A passive LC filter is designed to cancel the high-order harmonics. This approach allows substantial reduction of the harmonic ratio in the AC main output voltage without increasing the number of switches per period. Consequently, the duties of the semiconductor power switches are alleviated. The effectiveness of the new harmonic elimination PWM technique for reducing torque-ripple in inverter-fed induction motors is confirmed by simulation results. To show the validity of our approach, DSP-based experimental results are presented.

2. New three-phase inverter model

Figure 3 shows the new structure of the three-phase inverter, with E being the dc input voltage and U12-out=VC1-VC2, U23-out=VC2-VC3 and U31-out=VC3-VC1 are the ac output voltage obtained via a three LC filter. R represents the internal inductors resistance. Qi and Qi (i=1,2,3) are the semiconductor switches. It is worth to mention that transistors Qi and Qi undergo complementary switching states. VC1, VC2 and VC3 are the inverter filtered output voltages taken across capacitors C1, C2 and C3 respectively.

Figure 3.

New three-phase inverter model.

2.1. Harmonic analysis

In ideal case, the non filtered three inverter output voltage Vo1, Vo2 and Vo3 is desired to be:

{Vo1ideal=E2[1+cosα]Vo2ideal=E2[1+cos(α23π)]Vo3ideal=E2[1+cos(α43π)]E1

With: α=ωt, and ω is the angular frequency.

The relative Fourier harmonic coefficients of (1), with respect to E, are given by (2.1) or more explicitly by (2.2).

dki=1E1ππ+πVoiideal.cos(kα)dα1)d0i=1,d1i=12,dki=0,fork[2,[2)E2

With index i is the phase number.

However, in practice, the non filtered inverter output voltage Vo1 (Vo2, Vo3) is a series of positive impulses (see Fig. 4): 0 when Q1 (Q2, Q3) is on and E when Q1(Q2, Q3) is off, so that voltage of capacitor C1 (C2, C3) is always a null or a positive value. In this case, the relative Fourier harmonic coefficients, with respect to E, are given by (3).

ak1=2kπi=0Nαsinkαi(1)i+1E3

Where:

k is the harmonic order

αi are the switching angles

Nα is the number of αi per half period

The other inverter outputs Vo2 and Vo3 are obtained by phase shifting Vo1 with 2/3 π, 4/3 π, respectively as illustrated in fig. 4 for Nα=5.

The objective is to determine the switching angles αi so as to obtain the best possible match between the inverter output Vo1 and Vo1-ideal.

For this purpose, we have to compare their respective harmonics. A perfect matching is achieved only when an infinite number of harmonics is considered as given by (4).

2kπi=0Nαsinkαi(1)i+1=dk, for
k[0,[E4

In practice, the number of harmonics N that can be identical is limited. Thus, a nonlinear system of N+1 equations having Nα unknowns is obtained as:

ak=2kπi=0Nαsinkαi(1)i+1=dk, for
k[0,N]E5

To solve the nonlinear system (5), we propose to use the genetic algorithms, to determine the switching angles αi (Bäck, 1996; Davis, 1991). The optimal switching angles family are listed in table I.

Figure 4.

Inverter direct outputs representation for Nα=5.

FamilysymbolAngles (radians)Angles (degrees)
Nα=3α1
α2
α3
0.817809468
1.009144336
1.911639657
46.8570309622392
57.8197113723319
109.528884295936
Nα=5α1
α2
α3
α4
α5
1.051000076
1.346257127
1.689593122
2.374938655
2.47770082
60.2178686227288
77.1348515165077
96.8065549849324
136.073961533976
141.961799882103
Nα=7α1
α2
α3
α4
α5
α6
α7
0.52422984
0.57159284
1.14918972
1.41548576
1.66041537
2.16577455
2.29821202
30.0361573268184
32.7498573318965
65.8437208158208
81.1013600088678
95.134792939653
124.089741091845
131.677849172236
Nα=9α1
α2
α3
α4
α5
α6
α7
α8
α9
0.43157781
0.45713212
0.70162245
0.77452452
0.96140142
1.09916539
1.21595592
1.45409688
1.64220075
24.7275870444989
26.1917411558679
40.2000051966286
44.3769861253959
55.0842437838843
62.9775378338511
69.6691422899472
83.3136142271409
94.0911720882184

Table 1.

Optimal switching angles family with genetic algorithms

2.2. Dynamic LC filter behavior

Considering the inverter direct output fundamental, the LC filter transfer function is given by:

T¯=V¯C1V¯o1=11LCω2+jRCωE6

From (6), one can notice that for ω=0, T¯=1, meaning that the mean value (dc part) of the input voltage is not altered by the filter. Consequently, the inverter dc output part is entirely transferred to capacitor C1. The same conclusion can be drawn for capacitor C2 and C3.

Letting x=ωLCandy=RCL, the filter transfer function can rewritten as:

T¯=V¯C1V¯o1=11x2+jxyE7

For a given harmonic component of order k, the LC filter transfer function Tk is obtained by replacing ω with kω as:

T¯k=(V¯C1V¯o1)k=11x2k2+jkxyE8

Assuming that the filter L and C components are not saturated, and using the superposition principle, we obtain the inverter filtered output voltages VC1, VC2 and VC3, taken across capacitors C1, C2 and C3 as given by (9.1), (9.2) and (9.3) respectively:

VC1=E(a02+k=1NakTkcos(kα+φk))1)VC2=E(a02+k=1NakTkcos[k(α23π)+φk])2)VC3=E(a02+k=1NakTkcos[k(α43π)+φk])3)E9

Tk and φk are the kth order magnitude and phase components of the LC filter transfer function respectively.

Each k harmonic term of the inverter output voltage has a frequency of kω and an amplitude equal to akTk, Where ak is the amplitude of the kth order harmonic of Vo1.

The transfer function magnitude and phase are given, respectively, by:

|T¯k|=Tk=1(1x2k2)2+y2x2k2E10
φk=arctankxy1x2k2E11

The maximum value Tmax of Tk, obtained whendTdx=0, can be expressed by:

Tmax=1y21y214E12

In which case, (12) corresponds to a maximum angular frequency, this last is given by:

ωmax=2RC1y22E13

The maximum angular frequency ωmax exists if, and only if,y<2. The filter transfer function will exhibit a peak value then decreases towards zero. As consequence, the fundamental, as well as the harmonics, are amplified, this leads to undesirable situation, as illustrated in fig.5.

Figure 5.

LC filter transfer function magnitude for the fundamental.

If (14) is satisfied, the filter transfer function will exhibit a damped behaviour.

y=RCL>2E14

This condition matches both practical convenience and system objectives.

2.3. Harmonic rate calculation

Using (1) to (3), the non filtered inverter output voltages Vo1, Vo2 and Vo3 can be expressed as

Vo1=E2(1+cosωt)+a5cos5ωt+a6cos6ωt+...1)Vo2=E2[1+cos(ωt23π)]+a5cos5(ωt23π)+a6cos6(ωt23π)+...2)Vo3=E2[1+cos(ωt43π)]+a5cos5(ωt43π)+a6cos6(ωt43π)+...3)E15

Taking into consideration the filter transfer function, we get the expressions (16), (17) and (18) for VC1, VC2 and VC3 respectively.

VC1=E2[1+a1.T1.cos(α+φ1)+a8.T8.cos(8.α+φ8)+a10.T10.cos(10.α+φ13)+...E16
VC2=E2[1+a1.T1.cos([α23π]+φ1)+a8.T8.cos(8[α23π]+φ8)+a10.T10.cos(10[α23π]+φ10)+...E17
VC3=E2[1+a1.T1.cos([α43π]+φ1)+a8.T8.cos(8[α43π]+φ8)+a10.T10.cos(10[α43π]+φ10)+...E18

Using (15), (16), (17) and (18), we get the three inverter filtered output voltages expressions as:

{U12out=E32[a1T1cos(α+β1)+k=8k=3n+1k=3n+2akTkcos(kα+βk)]U23out=E32[a1T1cos(α+β123π)+k=8k=3n+1k=3n+2akTkcos(kα+βk23π)]U31out=E32[a1T1cos(α+β143π)+k=8k=3n+1k=3n+2akTkcos(kα+βk43π)]E19

with:

βk=φk+π6E20
.

From the precedent fig. 3, and for each lever, the equations with the currents and the voltages can be written in the following form (Bouchhida et al., 2007, 2008; Bouchhida, 2008, 2011).

  • Currents equations

{dvC1dt=1C1(i1i1ch)dvC2dt=1C2(i2i2ch)dvC3dt=1C3(i3i3ch)E21
  • Voltages equations:

{di1dt=(Vo1R1.i1vC1).1L1di2dt=(Vo2R2.i2vC2).1L2di3dt=(Vo3R3.i3vC3).1L3E22

These equations are put in following matric form:

ddt[vCI]=[03×31C×I3×31L×I3×3R×I3×3][vcI]+[1C×I3×303×303×31L×I3×3][ichVo]E23

with : vC=[vC1vC2vC3];I=[i1i2i3]; vo=[vo1vo2vo3]

3. Indirect field- oriented induction motor drive

The dynamic electrical equations of the induction machine can be expressed in the d-q synchronous reference frame as:

{didsdt=1σLs(Rs+RrMsr2Lr2)ids+ωsiqs+MsrRrσLsLr2ψdr+MsrσLsLrψqrωr+1σLsVdsdiqsdt=ωsids1σLs(Rs+RrMsr2Lr2)iqsMsrσLsLrψdrωr+MsrRrσLsLr2ψqr+1σLsVqsdψdrdt=MsrRrLridsRrLrψdr+ωgψqrdψqrdt=MsrRrLriqsωgψdrRrLrψqrE24
dΩrdt=fjΩr1j(CemCr)E25
Ωr=ωrpE26
Cem=pMsrLr(ψdriqsψqrids)E27

Where:

Vds , Vqs: d-axis and q-axis stator voltages;
ids , iqs: d-axis and q-axis stator currents;
ψdrqr: d-axis and q-axis rotor flux linkages;
Rs , Rr: stator and rotor resistances;
Ls , Lr: stator and rotor inductances;
Msr: mutual inductance
ωsr: electrical stator and rotor angular speed
ωg: slip speed ωg=(ωs-ωr)
Ωr: mechanical rotor angular speed
Cr , Cem: external load torque and motor torque
j , f: inertia constant and motor damping ratio
p: number of pole pairs
σ: leakage coefficient, (σ=1Msr2LsLr)

Table 2.

Equation (23) represents the dynamic of the motor mechanical side and (26) describes the electromagnetic torque provided on the rotor. The model of a three phase squirrel cage induction motor in the synchronous reference frame, whose axis d is aligned with the rotor flux vector, (ψdrr and ψqr=0), can be expressed as:
didsdt=γids+ωsiqs+KTrψdr+1σLsVdsE28
diqsdt=ωsidsγiqspΩKψdr+1σLsVdsE29
dψdrdt=MsrTrids1TrψdrE30
dψqrdt.=MsrTriqs(ωspΩ)ψdrE31
dΩdt.=pMsrJLr(ψdriqs)CrJfΩE32

With:

Tr=LrRr,K=MsrσLsLr,γ=RsσLs+RrMsr2σLsLr2.E33

The bloc diagram of the proposed indirect field-oriented induction motor drive is shown in fig.6. Speed information, obtained by encoder feedback, enables computation of the torque reference using a PI controller. The reference flux is set constant in nominal speed. For higher speeds, rotor flux must be weakened.

Figure 6.

Block diagram of the proposed indirect field oriented induction motor drive system.

4. Simulation results

To demonstrate the performance of a new tree-phase inverter, we simulated three filtered inverter output voltages. Two frequency values are imposed on the inverter, starting with a frequency of 50 Hz, then at time t=0.06(s) the frequency is changed to 60Hz. The three filtered inverter output voltages are illustrated in (figure 7.a) which clearly shows that the three voltages are perfectly sinusoidal and follow the ideal values with a transient time of 0.012(s). The harmonic spectrum of the filtered output voltage is shown in (figure 7.b). In order to compare the performance of the new three-phase inverter with the conventional PWM inverter, the output voltage of the latter, where a modulation index of 35 was used, is shown in (figure 8.a) and its harmonic spectrum is presented in (figure 8.b).

Figure 7.

a) Three filtered inverter outputs voltages.(b) Harmonic spectrum of the filtered output voltage.

Figure 8.

a) PWM inverter output voltage (b) Harmonic spectrum of thePWM inverter output voltage.

We carried out two simulations of the field-oriented control for induction motor drives with speed regulation using the new structure of the three phase inverter in the first simulation (figure 9.a) and the conventional PWM (figure 9.b) inverter in the second simulation. The instruction speed is set to 100 (rad/sec) for both simulations. During the period between 1.3(s) and 2.3(s), a resistive torque equal to 10 (N.m) (i.e the nominal torque) is applied.

In order to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed inverter, the torque response obtained by using the proposed and the conventional PWM inverters are shown in (figure 10.a) and (figure 10.b), respectively. The obtained results clearly show that the conventional PWM inverter generates more oscillations in the torque than the proposed structure (figure 11). Moreover, the switching frequency of the proposed inverter is dramatically reduced (see (figure 12.a)) when compared to its counterpart in the conventional PWM inverter (see figure 12.b). Therefore, the proposed inverter gives a better dynamic response than the conventional PWM inverter.

Figure 9.

a) Simulation results of the indirect field-oriented control for proposed inverters (b) Simulation results of the indirect field-oriented control for conventional PWM inverters

Figure 10.

a) Torque response for proposed inverters (b)Torque response for conventional PWM inverters

Figure 11.

Torque response for proposed and conventional PWM inverters

Figure 12.

a) Switching frequency for proposed inverters (b) Switching frequency for conventional PWM inverters

5. Experimental setup

The experimental setup was realized based on the DS1103 TMS320F240 dSPACE kit (dSPACE, 2006a, 2006b, 2006c, 2006d, 2006e). Figure 13 gives the global scheme of the experimental setup. This kit allows real time implementation of inverter and induction motor IM speed drive, it includes several functions such as Analog/Digital converters and digital signal filtering. In order to run the application the control algorithm must be written in C language. Then, we use the RTW and RTI packages to compile and load the algorithm on processor. To visualize and adjust the control parameters in real time we use the software control-desk which allows conducting the process by the computer.

The novel single phase inverter structure for pre-calculated switching is based on the use of IGBT (1000V/25A) with 10 kHz as switching frequency. The switching angles are predetermined off-line using Genetic Algorithms and stored in the card memory in order to speed up the programme running. The non-filtered inverter output voltages are first designed in Simulink/Matlab, then, the Real-Time Workshop is used to automatically generate optimized C code for real time application. Afterward, the interface between Simulink/Matlab and the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) (DS1103 of dSPACE) allows the control algorithm to be run on the hardware.

The master bit I/O is used to generate the required 2 gate signals, and a several Analog-to-Digital converters (ADCs) are used for the sensed line-currents, capacitors voltage, and output voltage. An optical interface board is also designed in order to isolate the entire DSP master bit I/O and ADCs. The block diagram of the experimental plant is given in figure 14

Figure 13.

Global scheme of the experimental setup

6. Experimental evaluation

Figure 15 shows the experimental filtered inverter output voltage (VC1-VC2) for frequency value equal 50 Hz. The filtered inverter output voltage is perfectly sinusoidal. The experimental result in Figure 16 shows the torque response obtained by using the proposed PCPWM inverter: during the period between 0.65 sec and 1.95 sec, a load torque equal to 13 (N.m) is applied. The torque ripple of the induction motor is dramatically reduced.

Figure 14.

Snapshot of the laboratory experimental setup

Figure 15.

Experimental inverter filtered output voltage.

Figure 16.

Experimental torque response for proposed PCPWM inverters

Moreover, as shown in Figure 17, the experimental switching frequency of the proposed PCPWM inverter is very less compared to the conventional PWM inverter one Figure 18. As a consequence, the proposed inverter provides higher dynamic response than the conventional PWM inverter in vector controlled induction motor applications.

Figure 17.

Experimental switching frequency for proposed PCPWM inverters

Figure 18.

Experimental switching frequency for conventional PWM inverters

7. Conclusion

A three-phase inverter model was developed by combining pre-calculated switching angles and a passive filter to eliminate inverter output harmonics. The inverter model needs a nonlinear system of equations for the switching angles computation. The proposed inverter model succeeds to substantially reduce the harmonics while using polarized capacitors. The reduced number of switching angles provides more reliability and increases system components life time. Moreover, the proposed inverter design and control simplicity could be used as a cost effective solution to harmonics reduction problem. The torque ripple of the induction motor is dramatically reduced by the PCPWM inverter. The global scheme of the experimental setup has been implemented. The obtained experimental results exhibit good matching with the theoretical values. It is shown that the proposed PCPWM has better tracking performance as compared with the conventional PWM.

Appendix

The squirrel cage induction motor data are:

SymbolQuantityValue
Pn
Vn
Cn
P
Rs
Rr
Msr
Ls
Lr
In
Ωn
f
J
C1, C2, C3
L
R
Rated power
Rated line voltage
Rated load torque
No. of pole pair
Stator resistance
Rotor resistance
Mutual inductance
Stator leakage inductance
Rotor leakae inductance
Rated current
Motor speed
Viscosity coefficient
Moment of inertia
Capacitance
Inductance
Internal inductor resistance
1.5 KW
220/380 V
10 Nm
2
5.62 Ω
4.37 Ω
0.46 H
0.48 H
0.48 H
6.4/3.7 A
1480 tr/min
0.001136 N.m.s/rd
0.0049 kg.m²
10 mF
0.5 mH
0.5Ω

Table 3.

Appendix

© 2012 The Author(s). Licensee IntechOpen. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Ouahid Bouchhida, Mohamed Seghir Boucherit and Abederrezzek Cherifi (November 14th 2012). Minimizing Torque-Ripple in Inverter-Fed Induction Motor Using Harmonic Elimination PWM Technique, Induction Motors - Modelling and Control, Prof. Rui Esteves Araújo, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/37883. Available from:

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